Speaking out for People with
 Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities


VOR Response to ACLU/SEIU Call for Cuts to Congregate Care

In a petition dated June 23, 2020 filed with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the ACLU, SEIU, and several partner groups outlined concerns with the federal response to the novel coronavirus epidemic and used these concerns to call for a 50 percent reduction in congregate care nationwide.  The petitioners defined congregate care to include nursing homes, intermediate care facilities for individuals with intellectual disabilities (ICFs/IID), psychiatric facilities, and home and community-based services (HCBS) group homes. 

On July 1st, VOR issued a firm response in opposition to ACLU and SEUI’s irresponsible and unreasonable demand which would remove all forms of long-term care for the elderly and persons with mental disabilities, except for the family home or private residence.

VOR - MFP Letters to the Senate Finance Committee

In March, 2020 VOR's Legislative Committee sent a letter to the Senate Finance Committee, asking for an opportunity to provide testimony from families whose loved ones’ interests, health and welfare are directly impacted by the Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Program.

VOR continues to speak out about the shortcomings of MFP, and the manner in which it has been used to undermine Intermediate Care Facilities and to deny individuals and families their right to choose ICF care.

Read VOR's March 12, 2020 letter here

Read VOR's July 23, 2019 letter here

People as Pendulums: Deinstitutionalization and People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

By Tamie Hopp, VOR Director of Government Relations & Advocacy in Nonprofit Quarterly, July 16, 2014 (and reprinted in the Summer 2014 Nonprofit Quarterly Print edition)

Early reforms were quite properly motivated by the need for a system of care and supports that responded to the very individualized and diverse needs of the entire population of people with I/DD. These reforms, however, also set the stage for decades of ongoing deinstitutionalization, resulting in the elimination of specialized housing, employment and education options for people with I/DD, leaving some to question the price of “progress.”