Speaking out for people with
 intellectual and developmental disabilities.


Olmstead Resources

The Supreme Court, in its landmark Olmstead v. L.C. ruling, recognized the need for a range of services which respond to the varied and unique needs of the entire disability community: “We emphasize that nothing in the ADA or its implementing regulations condones termination of institutional settings for persons unable to handle or benefit from community settings...Nor is there any federal requirement that community-based treatment be imposed on patients who do not desire it.”  119 S. Ct. 2176, 2187 (1999).

VOR Olmstead Resources

Abuse and Neglect Document

Related News: March 4, 2013 - U.S. Senator Christopher Murphy (D-CT) has called on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Inspector General to “undertake an immediate investigation into the alarming number of deaths and cases of abuse of developmentally disabled individuals” in small, privately-operated  group homes. Read the text of his letter here.
VOR's "Widespread Abuse, Neglect and Death in Small Settings Serving People with Intellectual Disabilities," document provides a bibliography of investigative media series, state audits and peer-reviewed research in more than half the states that detail systemic concerns with regard to quality of care in community-based settings for persons with developmental disabilities. Tragedies range from physical, emotional, and financial abuse, neglect and even death. Many of these outcomes are associated with a zest to move to a "community for all" vision people with developmental disabilities without adequately considering the ramifications of separating vulnerable people from specialized care and then doing away with a critical safety net (a/k/a deinstitutionalization). The lessons learned from more than 25 states should cause policymakers and lawmakers to take pause and recognize that a range of needs requires a range of service options.