Speaking out for People with
 Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Legislative Voice

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Our current legislative advocacy.

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Your Legal Right To An Intermediate Care Facility

Right To Intermediate Care Facilities for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICFs/IID)

Individuals who qualify for Intermediate Care Facilities for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICFs/IID)* under Medicaid have a legal right to such facilities for as long as they remain eligible and choose to do so. Despite a deinstitutionalization effort by those opposed to congregate care, the ICF/IID program remains a legally enforceable federal entitlement under Medicaid. States which have included ICF/IID in their Medicaid State Plans, but instead offer only Waiver services, are in violation of federal Medicaid law.

Conference Materials and Reports from VOR's 2017 Annual Meeting & Legislative Initiative

June 3 - 7, 2017

VOR's 2017 Annual Conference and Washington Initiative was held at the Hyatt Regency Capitol Hill again this year. By all accounts the conference and initiative were a great success, both in terms of reaffirming our committment to VOR's mission and in our efforts to take our message to legislators and their staff members.

Please click on the links below to see some of the materials presented to Congress at the Legislative Initiative and some of the materials and presentations from the Annual Meeting.

Legislative Initiative Materials

2017 State Reports

2017 Supplementary Materials

Abuse and Neglect Document

VOR's Ongoing Document:
Updated August 13, 2017
This document provides a bibliography of investigative media series, state audits and peer-reviewed research in more than half the states that detail systemic concerns with regard to quality of care in community-based settings for persons with developmental disabilities. Tragedies range from physical, emotional, and financial abuse, neglect and even death. Many of these outcomes are associated with a zest to move to a "community for all" vision people with developmental disabilities without adequately considering the ramifications of separating vulnerable people from specialized care and then doing away with a critical safety net (a/k/a deinstitutionalization). The lessons learned from more than 25 states should cause policymakers and lawmakers to take pause and recognize that a range of needs requires a range of service options.
 
 

VOR's Position on Sheltered Workshops

By Harris Capps and Joan Kelley

Sheltered Workshops are private non-profit, state, or local government entities that provide employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities. Persons served in this environment may include those with developmental, physical, and/or mental impairments, ranging from mild to extreme/profoundly affected individuals. Sheltered workshops:

  • Provide prevocational training, with the goal to prepare for competitive employment for available jobs in the open labor market
  • Emphasize support of individual needs, based on ability to choose work activities that fit with a person’s skills
  • Often include additional training in personal care, living skills and developing social skills
  • Honor the depth and scope of the DD population, recognizing that some individuals may not ever be able to be competitively employed

After completing a rehabilitation program, many individuals are able to leave the workshop environment and enter regular employment, if there is a job available for which they qualify. Individuals unable to obtain regular employment because of the severity of their impairments or unavailability of jobs can remain in the workshop environment. Individuals performing services are paid a fraction of, or up to minimum wage, depending on their capacity to perform the services. [1]